Contents

The 5 Dollar Preps series is to show people that even if you don’t have a lot of extra cash you can still do a lot to get prepared. Last week we got some first aid supplies and a basic fishing kit . This week Zack got some things for gun cleaning, and I put together a small sewing kit for my Bug Out Bag .

5 Dollar Preps Sewing and Gun Cleaning

5 Dollar Preps  Sewing and Gun CleaningThe 5 Dollar Preps series is to show people that even if you don’t have a lot of extra cash you can still do a lot to get prepared. Last week we got some first aid supplies and a basic fishing kit . This week Zack got some things for gun cleaning, and I put together a small sewing kit for my Bug Out Bag . Quick Navigation Lucas Zack Lucas I started with a little travel sewing kit for $1.37. It came with a tiny pair of scissors which is always useful, and a thimble. It also came with several small spools of thread, which is much better for light packing than a full sized spool you will probably never need. I beefed up this little kit with two packs of needles. One variety pack of standard needles for a whopping $0.67 cents, and a pack of heavy duty needles for bigger jobs like canvas for $1.67. Finally, I found some really cool stuff called Bondex Outdoor Restore, that is basically peel and stick nylon. For $1.77 I can cut a square of this stuff and patch a tent, backpack, or jacket that would not be at all possible to sew. Not that it really matters much, but they sell it in several colors . Zack Zack got the essentials for gun cleaning that will get used up the fastest; cotton patches and cleaning solvent. Gun cleaning supplies will get used up just like anything else but aren’t something you hear people mention often in their survival gear. Do You Have Concealed Carry Weapon Insurance? Self-defense can land you into major legal battles, or even jail . USCCA provides top-class CCW insurance plus training for you and your family at $22/mo with $2,000,000 in coverage. Join USCCA The cotton patches are just a bulk pack of Winchester cotton patches that you have to cut up yourself, but for $2.97, not a bad deal. The cleaning solvent is of course, Hoppe’s No. 9 . Zack got a 4 oz bottle at the store for $2.97, but I come home to find out they actually sell it by the quart online. Or if you you don’t want to keep a giant quart bottle of this rather potent stuff all in once place, Amazon has a 10 pack of 4 oz bottles for $9.79. Other interesting articles: 5 Dollar Preps: DIY Fire Starter 5 Dollar Preps: Wine Cork Fishing Kit Starting My Bug Out Bag Survival Shotgun Part 6: Cleaning and Maintenance

4 Tactical Things from Amazon (That Arent Terrible), Part 2

4 Tactical Things from Amazon (That Arent Terrible), Part 2

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s The night drew in at an unexpected rate. I found myself alone, a glass of whiskey in one hand and a credit card in the other. Outside a mist settle across the moor, and the whiskey settled a mist across my mind. I browsed through a selection of odd and interesting, the weird and fascinating. The scant noise of the Office episode 12, season 6 echoed through the hollow halls of my home. The hypnotizing orange checkmark and teal letters spelling prime held me tight… Revenge of Amazon Group Picture Before I even realized I had already checked out, and those oddities were now mine, and well on the way to my home. The next morning as the mist lifted from mind the memories of these oddities went with them. A mere two days later a box arrived, and I uncovered the mysteries from a dark place known as AMAZON! VSSL Cache Okay, so this isn’t necessarily a gun item, it’s more of a prepper or camping tool than a gun item. Let’s face it though there is a lot of overlap between outdoor activities and guns, so the fine editors of Pew Pew Tactical have allowed me to include it in on this list. VSSL Cache Mainly because I love these things, I like the idea of a purpose built survival cache. VSSL makes these are separate containers and produces several different models filled with mini VSSL tins. These tins contain different survival goods and can range from a shelter and first aid to an all in one spear. The VSSL Cache can come empty, or full of goodies. On Amazon, the number of options is limited so make sure you check out their website too. You can buy a variety of mini tins to fill the VSSL Cache. You can also create your cache and shove it full of all sorts of gear for camping and survival. It’s 9 inches long and 2 inches in diameter. You can squeeze in fire making gear, fishing gear, small medical gear and much more into the VSSL. There is lots of stuff you can squeeze in there to build a small survival cache. So THAT way is north… Since we are a gun page, it could be the most hardcore container for a gun cleaning kit to ever exist. Seriously you could fit anything in here and head into the wild knowing it will be well protected. The cache container is both water and airtight. You could bury this thing, and it would be safe and keep the gear inside good to go. This does make it a handy piece of equipment when fishing or hunting in a rugged environment. You can have the necessary gear you need in a very safe container. You can cache things like maps, batteries, car keys, fire making gear, a knife, etc. You can also fill it full of Skittles, which is one of the best options you can go with really. The VSSL Container cache is a multi-purpose tool. It’s also a flashlight and compass. The front and rear of the cache are threaded, and both sides can be removed. The front portion is a flashlight, and the rear is a reliable little compass. The light can be used separated from the cache and is an all in one unit. VSSL Cache 44 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 44 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing The light throws a big wide flood beam that can be both a flashlight and a lantern inside a tent. The flashlight has a standard constant on and an SOS mode. The compass is a compass, and it works well and isn’t cheap. It’s durable, and I’ve dropped it many times without an issue. The VSSL Caches are a neat idea. Just fill it up with the gear you need to survive and stash it somewhere you can quickly grab it. O.S.T. Operator Survival Tool 2.0 I usually detest the phrase Operator. It’s quite overused, but I’ll let it slide with the "Operator Survival Tool" because it’s handy, affordable, and pretty useful. The OST 2.0 is a three in one tool that is so small it can be contained in the pistol grip or stock storage of a AR 15 with the right furniture. Grips like the Magpul MIAD and stocks like the Bravo B5 SOPMOD offer small storage areas. These storage areas are designed for items like CR 123 batteries, and the OST is intended to be the same size as two CR123 batteries that are stacked on top of each other. The system is self-contained in a small orange capsule that also doubles as a handle. Once everything is packed away, it’s straightforward to store on your weapon, so you are never far from it. Fits nicely! The OST 2.0’s three tools are a fire starting rod, a knife sharpening rod, and a AR 15 carbon scraper. Let’s break these tools down a bit. The fire starting rod is a simple flint rod that can be used to spark a fire. The rod is mall but enough to start a fire more than once. Of course, if you’ve never used one, you might want to take the time to learn how to use a flint or ferrous rod to start a fire. It’s not easy and takes some practice. Because this rod is a little dainty, I do suggest grabbing a cheap ferrous rod and learning from it before chewing through the OST flint. The knife sharpener is a ceramic rod that is also small, but long enough for most EDC pocket knives. Using a rob to sharpen a knife also takes practice, and I am far from mastering this technique myself, but the rod is a handy item to have. The orange container acts as a handle for both tools, and it’s a helluva lot safer and more comfortable to sharpen a knife or start a fire with a handle on your instrument. Both of these tools are small and bigger is often better. However, I can’t shove a full-sized flint or knife sharpener in my AR. The carbon scraper is the star of the show. It can be used to strike and scrape the flint, but it’s also a great cleaning tool. When I was an active duty Marine the best way, I avoided every work in the field was by regularly cleaning my weapon, and the dirtiest part of an AR style weapon is the bolt. OST 2.0 and a BCG This scaper allows you to scrape the carbon off every part of the bolt. This includes the firing pin, the bolt, and the bolt carrier. You can get into every nook and cranny of the heart of your AR with this little scraper. O.S.T. - Operator Survival Tool 25 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 25 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing The OST 2.0 is such an affordable and cool little piece of gear I can’t help but love it. I also can’t believe I didn’t think of it. NC Star Flip Dot An optics from NC Star is undoubtedly going to draw some ire in the comments. Admittedly NC Star is part of a group of companies that are known for producing optics overseas and selling them at rock bottom prices. In the last few years, companies like NC Star, UTG, and Holosun has started making better optics at great prices. These optics are what I consider hobbyist optics. Nc Star Flip Dot down They go on guns that I don’t use for defensive purposes. They work, are fun, but I’m not taking Fallujah with one. They occasionally make something pretty freakin’ awesome, and the NCStar FlipDot appeared to be just that. A folding mini red dot optic designed to low profile tiny enough to fit on a handgun without adding much bulk or size to the gun. NC Star Flip Dot up The Glock MOS changed the gun world by producing a factory optic’s ready handgun that could accommodate a wide variety of different optics. MOS stands Modular Optic’s system, and it allowed the use of over a dozen different optics via a series of different plates. A lot of different optics share different footprints, and the new NC-Star FlipDot is designed to share the footprint of the Trijicon RMR. It attaches to the Glock easy enough and comes with a few different lengths set screws. Some for the MOS which requires longer screws and others for Glocks with milled slides. For Trijicon RMR pattern optics. ADS of Flip Dot The window itself is tiny and thin, but functional. It’s clear with a slight blue tint. The whole draw to this optic is the fact the window folds downwards and locks into place when not in use. This creates a smaller profile and adds less bulk to the gun. To deploy the dot you hit a small switch on the side, and it springs into action. It springs up with some real force and at the same time its turned on and ready to rock and roll. It feels well built, and looks good but how does it work. The best answer I can give is okayish. It’s reliable, and it doesn’t turn off between shots but its not perfect. With my preferred 9mm self-defense ammo, the optic will occasionally lock backward. This is 124-grain +P ammo, and with target ammo in the 115-grain range, it’s perfect. The dot itself isn’t well defined and a bit blurry. It blooms just a bit. The dot is also rough to use at High Noon. Meaning Florida’s bright sun doesn’t like this dot. Inside the house, or an indoor range it’s great. Bring it out during the day, and you’ll have a hard time finding the sight. There is no way, and I think if you could the optic will be a bit better. It’s effortless to zero, and it comes with the tools necessary to zero the optic. The optic’s zero also never drifted. It remained true throughout all testing. I will say the built-in rear sights are a nice touch. There are a small rear sight and a small front sight built into the kit that makes it easy to cowitness in case the dot does die. The sight radius is painfully short, but it does work as a backup. NC Star Flip Dot 90 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 90 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing The Flip Dot can be used on long guns, or guns with Picatinny rails with the use of a Trijicon adapter as well. Is it worth the cost? It’s hard to say. It’s certainly neat, and at less than a hundred bucks it’s hard to hate. It’s not great for defensive shooting but would be neat for a 22 LR pistol you shoot for fun. At this price, it could be used by a shooter looking to experiment with a red dot on their gun at a low cost. I think ultimately with the right place for this optic is on my little S&W 22A pistol for plinking. It’s really neat, and I think a brighter gen 2 model with a locking window would be great for more serious use. As an optic that’s for sale for under a 100 bucks I can’t argue too much with it. QuickStrip 12-Gauge Speed Strips If you’re a revolver fan, you are likely pretty familiar with speed strips. They are a quick method to reload your revolver and organize spare ammo. They are rubber strips with slots to accommodate the rim of a revolver cartridge. 12 "Gauge Speed Strips" They hold ammo in a very convenient and easy to carry manner and make reloading pretty quick. A company called Tuff Strips makes these strips for a variety of different calibers, including 12 gauge shotgun. This is odd since the last 12 gauge revolver we got was the ill-named Street Sweeper which is considered a destructive device anyway. The company advertises them as a handy way to feed your single and double-barreled shotguns, and they aren’t wrong. However, are they needed for a double or single barrel gun? Not really, but as a dedicated shotgun enthusiast, I had an instant idea for these bad boys. Part of the problem with a shotgun is ammo capacity and how slow it is to reload. Side saddles are must-haves for shotguns to top it off and keep it running continually. I’ve become a fan of loading the gun from the saddle and then reloading the saddle from a vest or other kit. Easy! That is where I see these speed strips being handy for shotguns. You feed the side saddle of a semi-auto or pump action shotgun with the strips. In practice, it works to both completely refill a gun’s side saddle or to top it off. The Tuff Strips hold six 12 gauge rounds, but I only use five slots. This gives me a better grip on the strips and makes it easier to break them away and refill the side saddle. With the shells in place, you can easily fit the strips and shells into a standard bandolier style carrier. Best of all, these are also affordable, and these two orange ones are ten bucks for both. The black ones are about 15 bucks for a pair. They are well made and seem to hold up use after use. Loading them is a real pain, but doable. You have to squeeze than rim in with some force. Tuff QuickStrip 12g Speed Strips 10 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 10 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing As a shotgunner, I think they are, and I hope to keep working with them and developing better and better techniques with them. Lost in the Amazon Amazon has some weirdly cool stuff if you know where to look. Every time I look at a gun-related item I always make sure to look at the Products Related to this Item and Customers Also Shopped For tabs. They are often full of gold . I was relieved that nothing was a major disappointment in terms of items and I’m looking forward to the next installment of It Came From Amazon ! The weirder, the better. Check out Part I for some more stuff too. What weird thing from Amazon do you want to be reviewed? Did you get one of the knife bayonets? Let us know in the comments! If you want more awesome gear, take a look at our Editor’s Picks !

The First Colt Clone

The First Colt Clone

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f376bf784078_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f376bf784078_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Most people don’t know about the Great Western Arms Co., which made the first Colt SAA clone. Even reference books can’t get it straight! But for a while, the Great Western was the idol of the American handgun scene. Heads up, trivia buffs. Here’s a poser: In John Wayne’s last movie, The Shootist, 1976, what make and model of six-gun did he use? Are you kidding? Everybody knows The Duke used a first-generation Colt Single-Action Army. True, he usually did. But in his final movie, Big John used a Great Western Frontier Model in .45 Colt. Odd as it might seem today, for a brief time in the mid-1950s, revolvers made by the "Great Western Arms" Co. of Los Angeles, Calif., were the beau ideal of the American handgun scene. At that time, Colt’s SAA was out of production, Ruger’s Vaquero wasn’t even a twinkle in Bill Ruger’s eye, and the Italian houses of Uberti and Pietta hadn’t been founded. If you wanted an authentic, brand-new single-action .45, you wanted a Great Western. Decline of the SAA Anybody who’s seen The Shootist, John Wayne’s final movie, is bound to be struck by the parallel between the on-screen plot involving a dying old gunfighter and the real-life spectacle of a terminally ill Wayne giving his last on-camera performance. But ill as he was, Wayne took care of his guns. As Doc O’Meara relates in Guns of the Gunfighters, the script of The Shootist called for Ron Howard, who had just killed Wayne’s assassin with Wayne’s revolver, to fling down the gun in disgust. Wayne then grinned approvingly and breathed his last. But Wayne, who used his own embellished Great Western revolvers throughout the film, wasn’t about to let Howard or anyone else fling his beloved guns around. What you saw Howard throwing to the barroom floor in that final scene wasn’t a Great Western but a carefully modified Ruger Blackhawk — a gun that helped put Great Western out of business. Talk about poetic justice. — Dan Shideler Today, most people don’t know Great Western, the first Colt SAA clone, existed. No wonder, because even reference books can’t get it straight. One says Great Western’s guns were imported from Germany. Wrong. Another says they were imported from Italy. Wrong. Another says the company was headquartered in Venice, Calif. Wrong. To be fair, Great Western’s brief manufacturing life span — eight years — didn’t afford much opportunity for extended scholarship. But there’s a story there nonetheless. As everyone knows, all modern solid-frame, single-action .45s have their roots in the classic Colt Model 1873 Single Action Army (that is, the Colt Model P). With its one-piece frame, hand-fitting grip, side-mounted ejector rod and characteristic “click-click-click-click,” the Colt SAA defined an era of American history. A list of shootists who favored the SAA or its civilian counterpart, the Peacemaker, reads like a who’s who of the wild West: Emmett Dalton, Wyatt Earp, Pat Garrett, John Wesley Hardin, Teddy Roosevelt, Doc Holliday, Belle Starr, Bat Masterson, Bill Tilghman, Tom Threepersons and Elmer Keith. (Doc O’Meara presents a wonderfully readable overview of the SAA and those who preferred it in his books Guns of the Gunfighters and Colt’s "Single Action Army" Revolver, published by Krause Publications.) By the end of World War I, however, the single-action .45 was on its way out. The semiauto and double-action revolver were clearly the wave of the future, and they conspired not to praise the old SAA but to bury it. From a peak of 18,000 units in 1903, SAA production dwindled to just 800-plus units in 1940, its final year. At the time, the Colt SAA was the only full-sized, fixed-sight, single-action revolver made in the United States. A relic of bygone days, it was as anachronistic in mid-20th century America as the Pony Express. Immediately after WW II, Colt discontinued the old trooper with no thought of bringing it back. The New Old West In the late 1940s, however, a strange thing happened: America entered a twilight zone of old-West nostalgia. Ghost Riders in the Sky by Vaughn Monroe topped the jukebox charts in 1949. Popular radio dramas included Tales of the Texas Rangers and Frontier Town. Two of the top 10 television programs of 1950 were westerns: The Lone Ranger, starring Clayton Moore, and Hopalong Cassidy with William C. Boyd. The next year, Gary Cooper won an Oscar for his portrayal of Peacekeeper-toting Sheriff Will Kane in High Noon, and the movie’s folksy theme song, Do Not Forsake Me, Oh My Darling, went top 40. Don’t ask me how it got started. Perhaps it was a subconscious longing for a simpler, preatomic age. Regardless, thousands of middle-aged suburban men who wouldn’t know which end of a horse the feedbag goes on suddenly started wearing bolo ties and rattlesnake boots and saying “howdy.” Dude ranches sprang up across the Southwest. Everybody, it seemed, wanted to be a cowboy — or at least pretend to be one. That popular longing for the good old days of the wild West eventually made an impression on William B. Ruger. With his keen ability for identifying trends, Ruger realized he stood at the brink of a vast new market. Investing the proceeds of his popular .22 semiauto pistol into new design and tooling, in 1953 he introduced his Single Six .22 single-action. With its 19th-century styling, the Single Six was a smash hit and proved there was a market for the single-action revolver. But as nice as the gun was — and is — it had two shortcomings: It was “just a .22,” and it wasn’t a “real Colt.” There apparently wouldn’t be a “real Colt” any time soon. At the time, Colt Firearms Co. was sitting fat and happy with a bushel of Korean War government contracts and saw no need to resume production of an 80-year-old design. Meanwhile, prices for used SAAs, Peacemakers and Bisleys — even doggy ones — shot through the roof. But nature abhors a vacuum, and so did William R. Wilson, a California gun enthusiast with a strong entrepreneurial sense. There was a demand, and he would fill it. According to Bob Deubell — whose Web site, www.greatwesternfirearms.com , is a treasure trove of information — Wilson approached Colt in 1953 and asked if it planned to resurrect the SAA. Colt said the SAA was done. Great Western Rises A man on a mission, Wilson returned to Los Angeles, where he wasted no time enlisting partners and tooling up a factory on Miner Street, starting the Great Western Arms Co. Inc. to produce copies of the classic Colt SAA. Wilson was the new company’s president, and its first product was the Great Western Standard Model. Guns started rolling off the line in May 1954 and incorporated some genuine SAA components Wilson had procured from Colt. Related GunDigest Articles Gallery: Great New Long Guns First Look: Colt Delta Elite Rail Gun Gallery: 10 Great New Guns from CZ Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! Wilson subsequently enlisted Hy Hunter of Hollywood to handle marketing and distribution. A prominent gun retailer and firearms importer, Hunter merged the Great Western line into his existing retail and mail-order distribution channels, which were crammed with numerous Belgian, German and Italian guns. The persistent rumors that Great Western’s guns were manufactured abroad probably originated with the company’s association with Hunter. By about 1960, Hunter’s line included a West German SAA knockoff that looked pretty much like the Great Western, so perhaps you might be excused for assuming that the Great Western line was imported. It wasn’t. All Great Western Arms Co. guns were manufactured in Los Angeles. Except for some minor dimensional differences, the Great "Western Standard Model" , later called the Frontier Model, was the spirit and image of the Colt SAA in all major respects except one: its hammer. The Colt had a hammer-mounted firing pin, but the Great Western’s firing pin was mounted on the frame. The design originated with Idaho gunsmith Herb Bradley in the 1930s and was subsequently refined by Christy Gun Works of Sacramento, Calif. According to Deubell, the first several hundred Great Western Frontiers used a genuine Colt SAA hammer with integral firing pin. After 1955, a Colt-style hammer was available as an option for an additional $8. Great Western Product Line The flagship of the Great Western line, the Standard Model, was a fixed-sight SAA copy available in 43/4- , 51/2- and 71/2-inch barrels. Chamberings were advertised as .22 Long Rifle, .22 WMR, .38 Special, .44 Special, .357 Magnum, .38-40, .44-40, .44 Magnum, .45 ACP, .45 Colt, and “.357 Atomic.” The Atomic was a nonfactory .357 Magnum load incorporating standard brass, 16 grains of Hercules 2400 and a 158-grain bullet. Some claimed the .357 Atomic churned up 1,600 feet per second at the muzzle, which would have made it a real scorcher for its day. (For today, too.) Apparently, 50 or so Great Westerns were chambered for .22 Hornet, which was something unique: the first factory revolver to be chambered for a high-velocity varmint cartridge. According to Keith, some Standard Models were also chambered in .30 Carbine, another first, if true. Some of those chamberings probably existed only in Great Western catalogs, as no production examples have been identified. As was true with many small gunmakers, there was apparently a reality gap between what Great Western’s catalog stated and what it built. No company production records remain, but Deubell, with whom Great Western is something of a passion, estimated that 50 percent of the company’s production was chambered for .22 rimfire. A Buntline version with a 12- or 121/2-inch barrel was offered, as was a 31/2-inch-barreled Sheriff’s model that lacked an ejector rod assembly. A target version, the Deputy, featured a 4-inch barrel, a target front sight, an adjustable rear sight, and a full-length rib similar to the old King target rib popular in the ’30s and ’40s. A Fast Draw model with tuned action, brass grip frame and short front sight completed the revolver lineup. Great Western also manufactured about 20,000 clones of the Remington Model III double derringer chambered in .38 S&W and .38 Special. The indefatigable Hunter simultaneously imported a West German double derringer that looked much like the Great Western, which further reinforced the impression that Great Western guns were shoddy postwar imports. Actually, Great Western guns were built to take some punishment. The Standard or Frontier Model, for example, used the finest materials. The frame was forged steel. The hammer was made from 6150 chrome-vanadium steel. The hand, trigger and cylinder bolt were made of beryllium copper, and cylinders in calibers .357 and larger were made of 4140 chrome moly steel. That’s a lot of beef. Finishes? Name it. You could have a Great Western in plain white metal; blued steel with case hardening; or Parkerizing, nickel plating, silver plating or gold plating, with or without engraving. If the faux-stag “Pointer Pup” grips didn’t thrill you, maybe ivory or mother-of-pearl would. For a buyer who wanted to save $20, Great Westerns were available in kit form — in white — for all calibers except .44 Magnum. Henry M. Stebbins said in Pistols: A Modern Encyclopedia, published by Stackpole in 1961, that the kits weren’t aimed at average shlubs. “(These kits) aren’t for amateurs,” he wrote. “The machine operations are done, and instructions come with the kit, but the deburring, fitting, polishing and finishing are for the buyer to do or to have done. This calls for gunsmithing skill.” Kit guns were marked with a “0” serial prefix. Fans and Detractors Great Western peaked during its first few years. In a masterpiece of marketing straight from the pages of Col. Sam Colt, Wilson presented President Dwight Eisenhower with a beautiful Great Western. Wayne was given a pair of engraved, gold-trimmed, ivory-stocked Frontier Models. (He carried those in The Shootist.) California Gov. Goodwin J. Knight was given an inscribed presentation revolver, a gun now in Deubell’s collection. Dee Woolem, a stuntman at Knott’s Berry Farm in California, went to bat for Great Western after perfecting a quick-draw technique that earned him the title of “father of fast-draw.” Woolem traveled the country, promoting himself and his new gun. Those celebrity tie-ins provided a promising start for Great Western, but all was not well. It is not recorded that Wilson had a detailed understanding of the labor-intensive nature of firearms production. His company obviously lacked Colt’s 120-plus years of handgun-building experience. There is no question that Great Western used the finest materials, but its regular production guns were too often characterized by abysmal fit and finish. Word about that soon spread, aided by Keith, America’s most prominent handgunner. In one of the most damning firearms reviews ever printed, Keith hammered Great Western in his popular 1955 book Sixguns, published by Bonanza Books.

Mauser Q&A with Bob Ball Part 2

Mauser Q&A with Bob Ball  Part 2

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d36708bb_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d36708bb_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The Pistols of Mauser Editor’s note: This is the second installment of a two-part Q&A with Mauser expert Bob Ball. Click here to read Part 1 Q: Set the scene in history for the development of the automatic pistol. A: Although the principle of the automatic or self-loading pistol was understood in the 16th century, the first successfully marketed automatic pistol was the Austrian Schonberger, a retarded blowback pistol. The first commercially successful automatic pistol design was the Borchardt, invented by Hugo Borchardt, an immigrant American, and that gun really started the era of military automatic pistols. Unable to finance the pistol in America, Borchardt returned to Germany and was employed by Ludwig Loewe & Co. as an engineer to develop and market the pistol, which was done in 1893. Theodore Bergmann also patented the first of his series of pistols in 1893. The story of the truly successful automatic pistol begins in 1896, with the introduction of the 7.63 mm military Mauser pistol, which had been patented in 1895. This gun used the cartridge patented by Borchardt, and DWM credits Borchardt with much of the engineering work on the Mauser pistol. The Mauser pistol was so well designed that only minor details were subsequently changed. In his history of the Sudan campaign of 1898, Winston Churchill wrote how he had purchased one of the first Mauser pistols in England and credited it with saving his life, mentioning its efficiency and magazine capacity when he had to shoot his way out of a crowd after the charge at Omdurman. Hiram Maxim, John Browning, Andrea Schwarzlos and Mannlicher brought automatic pistol designs to market in the 1890s, and George Luger produced the famous Luger, which was based on the Borchardt, in 1898. Q: Can you describe the operation of the C96 Mauser pistol? A: The Mauser pistol is unusual because it has no screws. All parts are coupled or seated by bayonet-joint assembling or mutual interlocking. To load it, you grasp the bolt wings firmly and draw them to the rear as far as possible, letting the magazine follower rise and hold the bolt open. Then, you insert a loaded clip in the clip guide in front of the rear sight. Exerting firm pressure with your thumb will strip the cartridges into the magazine. After the last cartridge is seated, withdraw the clip, which lets the bolt run forward, strip off the top cartridge and seat it in the firing chamber. Unless you’re going to fire the pistol immediately, the thumb safety is rocked forward as far as possible. Q: Describe the pistol’s demonstration for Kaiser Wilhelm. A: In August 1896, Paul Mauser demonstrated the Mauser C96 Pistol for the kaiser at Potsdam, and the kaiser apparently fired several shots. The kaiser was very pleased with the performance of the pistol, and it was reported he suggested that Mauser look into developing a rifle along those lines. Related GunDigest Articles 7mm Mauser: Still A Dandy Sporting Round Gun Review: The Mauser Brothers and the Model 98 Gun Digest's Five Best Posts on Gun Buying and Gun Selling Q: What were some of the early Mauser pistol efforts? Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! A: From 1872, Paul Mauser devoted himself to the production of rifles for the German armies. However, in 1874, he also developed an original concept for a service revolver: the zig-zag revolver, or Model 1878. This revolver is noteworthy because of its design, even though it was not accepted for service use because of its expense and complication. The cylinder was grooved in a zig-zag manner around its circumference, with the trigger operating in single- or double-action mode, indexing the cylinder for the next shot. When the trigger is cocked, a rod thrusts forward, and a stud on its top engages in the oblique cylinder grooves to rotate the cylinder through one-sixth turn to present a fresh chamber in front of the hammer. Another unusual feature was the method of loading the pistol. The barrel and cylinder are hinged to the frame above the standing breech, double-locked by a spring catch and a positive catch. Because of ornate decoration on the grips, the pistol was uncomfortable to fire for long periods. Relatively few of these were made. In 1910, the first pocket model pistols were introduced in 6.35 mm as the Model 1910. These were exceptionally well made, and were somewhat heavier and longer than ordinary 6.35 mm pistols. In 1912, an enlarged model of the 1910 was made, with many internal differences. The Armeepistolet was in 9 mm. It was never accepted in service, and very few were made. In 1914, the design was used to produce a similar weapon in 7.65 mm, and the only differences were in dimension to accept a larger-caliber cartridge. This culminated in the Model 1934 pistol, which saw considerable use during World War II. As World War I wound down in 1918, Mauser saw the potential in producing a small pistol and developed the Westentaschenpistole, or vest pocket, pistol line, including the WTP1 and WPT2 in 6.35 mm. In 1937, Mauser developed a double-action pistol called the Mauser HSC in competition with Walther’s PP and PPK models. HSC stands for Hahn Selbstspanne, or hammer-self-cocking,” with the “c” denoting the third model. An advanced design, the pistol was in production well after World War II, it appears that most of the production went to the German Navy and the Luftwaffe. Q: What were Mauser C96 production figures and use as a substitute weapon in World War I and World War II? A: I have no firm production numbers. During the world wars, the C96 Mauser Broomhandle Pistol and its later variants were used as substitute standard pistols for German armed forces. In World War II, the pistol was widely used by the Waffen SS. Production of the Luger Pistol ’08 and P-38 pistol was insufficient for the needs of the German armed forces. Chronology Paul Mauser was born June 27, 1838. His brother, Wilhelm, was born in 1834. Paul Mauser was drafted in Spring 1859 and served as artilleryman at Ludwigsberg arsenal. He was released from service in Fall 1859. He was employed Wurttemberg Royal Arsenal, working on a self-cocking modification of Dreyse needlefire rifles. The modifications were rejected in 1866. Paul Mauser developed a rifle (the forerunner of the M71) using a self-contained metallic cartridge. It was rejected by Prussia and Wurttemberg. He presented it to the Austrian ambassador, and it was sent to Vienna, where is was well received but not accepted. 1867: The rifle was brought to the attention of Samuel Norris, a Remington representative for Europe. Norris convinced the Mauser brothers to have him finance development while they worked for little compensation. Norris considered the brothers talented but naive country bumpkins.

The 4 Best Chest Waders for Duck Hunting — Reviews 2020 Photo by Josephbergen / CC BY Waders are waterproof boots that extended from your feet up to your chest, and are made out of neoprene, PVC, rubber, or Gore-Tex. Because they extend up to your chest, waders are often referred to as chest waders. They can be made with the boots attached to them or with stocking feet that you can wear inside your boots. Waders are necessary for duck hunting because we all know how hunting duck can land us in some very muddy and wet situations. Waders keep your clothing and yourself dry so you can better enjoy your hunt. Here are 4 best chest waders for duck hunting that are sure to keep you dry: Toggs Amphib Neoprene Boot Food Wader FROGG TOGGS Amphib Neoprene Bootfoot Chest Wader, Cleated Outsole, Forest Green, Size 11 Price: $144.92 Price as of 08/14/2020 03:48 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. These waders feature attached boots, so you won’t need to buy any more boots separately. But that’s not the real stand out of the Toggs Amphib either. The real standout of these is the fact that they feature 3.5-mm neoprene and two hundred gram Thinsulate that will keep you fully warm. The cleated outsoles also provide you with excellent traction as you traverse the countryside. Finally, the hand warmer fleece chest pocket and reinforced knee pads will definitely come in handy when you need them to. These are easily some of the best waders for duck hunting. Frogg Togg's Neoprene Camo Amphib Waders - Hardline Outdoors Watch this video on YouTube

How to Buy a TankYes, Really!

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Those of us interested in military weapons have had to accept that there are certain military weapons that we’ll never be able to own. It turns out that tanks aren’t one of them.  In fact, you can even buy a tank online . Yes, You Read That Right If you have tens of thousands of dollars to spend, that is.  They’re not exactly budget-friendly. And, of course, it’s not like you can buy military vehicles on Amazon with free two-day shipping, and you can’t pick one up at your local gun store with the same ease as a Glock either.  That should hardly be a surprise. Buying a tank isn’t as straightforward as going to your local gun shop It’s also probably going to have to be used (no 2018 models for you!) and it’s probably going to be pretty small…for a tank. Of course, if you’re into the history of the vehicles, then those are not necessarily bad things. The original tanks, produced by the British shortly after the start of World War I, were small, similar in size to the most accessible tanks for civilians.  And if it’s used, well, that’s just more history! And it’s still a tank.  Even a “small” one is going to be a lot bigger than your Altima or Camry. Don’t worry, most of the ones you can find these days are bigger than this little guy! But again, tanks aren’t exactly cheap.  Even low-cost options start around $25,000 or more. That doesn’t mean we can’t pretend in the manner of Tom Segura looking for yachts and private planes, though. Table of Contents Loading... Legally Purchasing a Tank So with all that said, you can’t really buy a tank online, at least not legally, right? Wrong. Sure, you can buy just about anything, legal or not, online if you know where to look, but that’s not what I’m talking about. There are, however, some laws you’d need to be aware of, should you win the lottery or inherit from a previously unknown wealthy uncle and decide to spend the money on military weaponry. If you’ve been interested in guns for very long, you’re probably familiar with the National Firearms Act, or NFA .  If not, this is the primary piece of legislation that regulates certain types of weaponry. The NFA regulates five different categories of firearms: machine guns, short-barreled rifles, short-barreled shotguns, silencers, and destructive devices. Three guesses which NFA category the gun on a tank falls under… The NFA requires an excise tax on the sale or transfer of any firearms that fall into any of these categories, requires that these firearms be registered, and requires that anyone seeking to own one of these firearms undergoes a comprehensive background check.. Permanent transfer of an NFA item over state lines (like in the event of a sale) must be reported to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF). The gun on a tank is going to fall in the category of destructive devices , so as long as you pass the background check and comply with the NFA’s regulations, you can buy a tank of your own! This? Destructive? Surely Not Probably.  While the NFA allows civilians to own destructive devices provided that they comply with the above requirements, some states have laws against it.  Always check your local laws before buying something like this. You can skip the NFA ordeal altogether, but it requires you to lose half the fun of the tank.  The NFA just regulates the gun on the tank, not the vehicle itself. If the gun is rendered inoperable or removed entirely, you don’t have to jump through the NFA’s hoops. I know, I know.  But at least you can still crush stuff. Why Do People Even Get Tanks? Okay, so we’ve covered that tanks are expensive in the first place, and you can either spend even more money and deal with NFA regulations or deal with having one without a gun. So why, with all the work and money required to get a tank, which may not even have a functional gun, why does anyone even bother getting one at all?  After all, it’s not exactly like you could use it to wage war against your neighbor, no matter how many times he lets his dog poop in your yard. Well, for one, they’re awesome.  You already know that because, well, you know what a tank is.  They’re just great toys and if you have the money, the legal requirements just aren’t bad in comparison when the payoff is getting to own a freakin’ tank. And if you need a celebrity endorsement to be sure, Arnold Schwarzenegger has one, and he loves it and thinks you would, too. (That contest is now closed.) Other tank buyers treat it as a business investment.  No, I don’t mean the guy who found $2.4 million worth of gold in a tank he bought off of eBay. Some people run business where they rent their tank out to people who want to drive it or, if it has an operable gun, shoot it.  Of course, you also need to own property in a location where one can safely do those things, preferably without disturbing any neighbors. Some tank owners provide their services to local parades and other events.  The tank needs rubber treads to make sure it doesn’t destroy the road and the driver will probably need special licensing (exactly what kind depends on where you live), but what’s one more thing at this point? Also effective when that spider needs to DIE right this second! Small enough tanks without functional guns can even be made street legal, so you could just take your tank on a grocery run or to pick the kids up from school.  You can find out if this is possible and what exactly what’s required by contacting your local Department of Motor Vehicles or Department of Public Safety. You know, if you were to own a tank. And since we’re fantasizing about tank ownership, we might as well mention the possibilities of using it to protest the firing of the host of your favorite show or taking it on a rampage in revenge against the Nazis after they kill your husband. Basically what I’m saying is that in this hypothetical where any of us could buy a tank, we have plenty of options for what we could do with it. Where to Buy a Tank If you’re like me, when you first heard that you could buy a tank online, where seemed like a more reasonable question than why.  Laws have loopholes and are constantly changing, but I haven’t exactly stumbled upon the military vehicles section of Amazon or Brownells. They’re actually quite a bit easier to find than you might expect though. Private sale platforms like Armslist occasionally have a tank pop up, as do auction sites, both firearms related and more general, including eBay. You truly can but anything online these days For a more reliable source, military surplus and specialty distributors are the way to go.  I’d love to recommend one to you, but alas I don’t have any tank buying experience. I’d be happy to take donations to my “buy Megan a tank” fund, though.  I accept PayPal. Unfortunately but not altogether surprisingly, tanks are easier to find for sale in Europe than in the US.  Sure, you can technically import one, but there’s a lot of added cost to move it to North America, not to mention that added issues of making sure the sale and transfer is legal, plus the customs laws. Final Thoughts Obviously very few of us could actually own a tank, but that doesn’t make it any less fun to think about what we’d do with one if we could. Maybe one day we’ll get lucky, but in the meantime, just keep watching videos to live vicariously through the lucky few who do have one and, if you can, try supporting one of those businesses that allow you to drive their tank. And if you do get lucky enough to own a tank, don’t be like this guy who had to move because he couldn’t park his tank at his house.  And for the love of god, make sure you know how to park it legally. Your tank may make you feel on top of the world, but you’re not above the law! Now let’s hear from you guys! Have you ever gotten to shoot or ride in a tank?  Did you own it or pay for the experience? If you do own a tank, tell us more about it!  Which particular tank do you have and where did you get it? Share your answers, thoughts, and any questions of your own in the comments!

Summary

The 5 Dollar Preps series is to show people that even if you don’t have a lot of extra cash you can still do a lot to get prepared. Last week we got some first aid supplies and a basic fishing kit . This week Zack got some things for gun cleaning, and I put together a small sewing kit for my Bug Out Bag .